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How to safely watch a solar eclipse

People in Eeyou Istchee will be able to watch a rare event in the sky at daybreak on Thursday, June 10, 2021 – an annular solar eclipse. 

The moon will pass in front of the sun and cover it almost entirely. The edges of the sun will be visible behind the moon in what will look like a ring of fire. 

 

Closeup of an eye

Did you know?

Looking directly at a solar eclipse can cause permanent eye damage. Even during a partial eclipse, the sun’s rays can still cause serious damage to the retina of your eye. 

Special glasses are needed to watch the eclipse directly. The Canadian Space Agency recommends specialty glasses that meet the ISO 12312-2 international standard. 

Normal sunglasses will not protect your eyes.  

HOW TO SAFELY WATCH THE ECLIPSE

Protect your eyes. If you don’t have a safe viewing filter or special glasses, you can make your own eclipse observation box. Use a shoebox or other small box, and follow the diagram below.   

How to build your projector

You will need:

  •  An empty cardboard box (the longer it is, the larger the image of the Sun)
  •  White paper
  •  Scissors
  •  Aluminum foil
  •  A pin
  •  Tape
  1. Open the box and, using tape, cover one of the inner sides with white paper.
  2. On the opposite side of the white paper, cut two holes side by side and at least 10 cm apart (one for the Sun, the other to look in).
  3. Cover the Sun hole with aluminum foil and tape it in place.
  4. Grab your pin and poke a tiny hole in the aluminum foil.
  5. Seal the box tightly.
  6. Decorate the outside of your new projector to make it your own! (optional)

 

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Caption
© Canadian Space Agency.

 

How to use your projector

  1. Turn your back to the Sun.
  2. Look through the eye hole and try to position yourself so that you see a projection of the Sun on the white paper.
  3. When the Moon starts going over the Sun, you will see its shadow slowly covering the Sun.

The eclipse will happen at different times in different regions. To learn more, visit Canada Space Agency’s website: https://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/astronomy/eclipses/solar-eclipses.asp 

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